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Old 07-26-2005, 08:09 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Vitamin supplements for alcohol withdrawel and anxiety

I wish I would've had this information handy in my first 30 days! Be aware that many of these supplements are harmful to your liver when combined with booze!!

Many alcoholics are deficient in B vitamins, including vitamin B3. John Cleary, M.D., observed that some alcoholics spontaneously stopped drinking in association with taking niacin supplements (niacin is a form of vitamin B3). Cleary concluded that alcoholism might be a manifestation of niacin deficiency in some people and recommended that alcoholics consider supplementation with 500 mg of niacin per day. 4 Without specifying the amount of niacin used, Cleary's preliminary research findings suggested that niacin supplementation helped wean some alcoholics away from alcohol. 5 Activated vitamin B3 used intravenously has also helped alcoholics quit drinking. 6 Niacinamide-a safer form of the same vitamin-might have similar actions and has been reported to improve alcohol metabolism in animals. 7

Deficiencies of other B-complex vitamins are common with chronic alcohol use. 8 The situation is exacerbated by the fact that alcoholics have an increased need for B vitamins. 9 It is possible that successful treatment of B-complex vitamin deficiencies may actually reduce alcohol cravings, because animals crave alcohol when fed a B-complex-deficient diet. 10 Many doctors recommend 100 mg of B-complex vitamins per day.

Alcoholics may be deficient in a substance called prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a precursor to PGE1. 11 In a double-blind study of alcoholics who were in a detoxification program, supplementation with 4 grams per day of evening primrose oil (containing 360 mg of GLA) led to greater improvement than did placebo in some, but not all, parameters of liver function. 12

The daily combination of 3 grams of vitamin C, 3 grams of niacin, 600 mg of vitamin B6, and 600 IU of vitamin E has been used by researchers from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in an attempt to reduce anxiety and depression in alcoholics. 13 Although the effect of vitamin supplementation was no better than placebo in treating alcohol-associated depression, the vitamins did result in a significant drop in anxiety within three weeks of use. Because of possible side effects, anyone taking such high amounts of niacin and vitamin B6 must do so only under the care of a doctor.

Although the incidence of B-complex deficiencies is known to be high in alcoholics, the incidence of other vitamin deficiencies remains less clear. 14 Nonetheless, deficiencies of vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and vitamin C are seen in many alcoholics. While some reports have suggested it may be safer for alcoholics to supplement with beta-carotene instead of vitamin A, 15 potential problems accompany the use of either vitamin A or beta-carotene in correcting the deficiency induced by alcoholism. 16 These problems result in part because the combinations of alcohol and vitamin A or alcohol and beta-carotene appear to increase potential damage to the liver. Thus, vitamin A-depleted alcoholics require a doctor's intervention, including supplementation with vitamin A and beta-carotene accompanied by assessment of liver function. Supplementing with vitamin C, on the other hand, appears to help the body rid itself of alcohol. 17 Some doctors recommend 1 to 3 grams per day of vitamin C.
Kenneth Blum and researchers at the University of Texas have examined neurotransmitter deficiencies in alcoholics. Neurotransmitters are the chemicals the body makes to allow nerve cells to pass messages (of pain, touch, thought, etc.) from cell to cell. Amino acids are the precursors of these neurotransmitters. In double-blind research, a group of alcoholics were treated with 1.5 grams of D,L-phenylalanine (DLPA), 900 mg of L-tyrosine, 300 mg of L-glutamine, and 400 mg of L-tryptophan (now available only by prescription) per day, plus a multivitamin-mineral supplement. 18 This nutritional supplement regimen led to a significant reduction in withdrawal symptoms and decreased stress in alcoholics compared to the effects of placebo.

The amino acid, L-glutamine, has also been used as an isolated supplement. Animal research has shown that glutamine supplementation reduces alcohol intake, a finding that has been confirmed in double-blind human research. 19 In that trial, 1 gram of glutamine per day given in divided portions with meals decreased both the desire to drink and anxiety levels.
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Old 07-26-2005, 08:39 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I think this ought be e-mailed to every AA meeting in the world plus every doctor...
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Old 07-26-2005, 09:14 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I was also given some --- acid that the liver produces. Can't remember name. However, I would like to suggest that those taking medication check or ask the pharmacy about any interference from Vitamins. The VA provides a list of items not to take with my Paxil. Along with diet aids, I was surprised by some of the vitimins on the list. I know with some heart and blood pressure medications vitimin C and even foods like Grapefruits can render the medication useless. One CVS, Pharmisists suggested I stay away from a multi vitimin Centrum Plus. I find your information great and helpful, and only offer this because of interactions of drugs. Don W
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Old 07-27-2005, 04:40 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Lots of good info.
In my long recovery time I did some research on vitamins, minerals & herbs. There was so much "You can take this with that but not that with this" and I got so overwhelmed I decided to keep it simple. First I started juicing my fruits & vegetables. I bought the "Juice ladys guide to juicing for health" and found a combination that works for me for my gender, age and needed vitamins. It tells of the best juices for each disorder. Juicing is more benifical than taking a vitamin because juice & vegetable, once juiced, goes straight to the blood stream, where as a vitamin has to go through the digetive track and blah blah blah before you reap the benifits. As soon as I sobered up this last time( sober 5 weeks now) I returned to my same pattern of juicing about every other day. I use Spinach, celery, carrots, parsley, beets, and an apple, sometimes I throw in a cucumber or whatever is in the crisper drawer!! Then for minerals I take flaxseed oil, evening primrose, magnesium & zinc..(You also get some of these minerals in mineral water.) And seeings there is no B12 in fruits and vegetables I drink Soymilk, eat Soy products, eat poultry and for Omega 3 I eat Fish! Plus excersize and I feel pretty darn healthy.
Just thought I would share this.
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Old 07-27-2005, 09:55 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Yes Vickie and Don, Absolutely right on! I think it really important to check for interactions with any medicine and vitamin therapy.. I did take L-Glutamine once when I got sober quite a few years ago and it did help with my depression from cocaine withdrawel but because it made me slightly "speedy" I found it uncomfortable because I was so accustomed to having a drink when tweaked! Of course I've already mentioned in other posts that I then went on to become a full fledged drunk!! I didn't know then the dangers of replacing one addiction with another.
Women alcoholics and evening primrose oil get along great together because of the benefit experienced for both PMS and alcohol cravings...
Also I'm not sure what interactions there might be between Milk Thistle and other drugs, but if your liver is in bad shape it will significantly help repair it.
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Old 10-17-2007, 12:27 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Yup. I took Vitamin B complex and a good multi vitamin for my first 3 months of sobriety.

During acute detox, they did little or no good. Just plain old water & electrolytes, then calorie laden food when you can hold it down.
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Old 10-17-2007, 04:09 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Adding to this idea of supplements ...

I found following an eating plan for
hypoglycemia
a boost to getting myself
back into a healthy balance.

Please use Google for info on hypoglycemia.
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Old 04-30-2013, 05:41 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I've recently read a lot about a supplement called Dihydromyricetin "DHM". It is advertised as a "sober pill" meaning it actually makes you feel more sober if you take it after drinking.

But a lot of research shows it can help a lot with alcohol withdrawal because of the effect it has on GABA receptors (which are heavily effected by long-term alcohol consumption).

This is the article I read about it: Can Dihydromyricetin (DHM) Lower Alcohol Dependency and Lessen Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms?
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Old 04-30-2013, 06:12 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Great article, thanks

Often what leads people to drink is depression, and often what leads to (or at least exacerbates) depression is vitamin deficiency. Almost everyone in the West is deficient in something because we generally have terrible diets, and lots of the natural goodness in food is stripped out by modern farming methods - so even when you eat "healthy", you still might not be getting everything you need,

I read an interesting article once that almost 100% of depressives (and, incidentally, also of cancer patients) are deficient in:

*B-vitamins
*Magnesium
*Iodine
*Zinc

I think there's definitely a lot of credible weight to vitamin-deficiency theories where it comes to various disorders and addictions, and it makes me mad when doctors barely address this issue at all and just try to drug everyone.

Before anything else, I'd suggest anyone with depression, anxiety, or an addiction issue tries seriously supplementing their diet.

Oh, and milk thistle is really good too - has been known for centuries to regenerate the liver, and has a host of other health benefits too.
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Old 04-30-2013, 10:47 PM   #10 (permalink)
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a simple list

I used to sell vitamins
these below I think to be very good for the average person

caution
many brands of vitamins that claim they are the best
are just blowing smoke
a common Wal-Mart is a good place to buy reasonably prices vitamins


multi-vitamin
B Complex
fish oil
calcium, Magnesium, zinc, D -- comes together in one daily pill
E

iron -- mostly for women only -- too much very bad for men

saw palmetto for men -- for the prostate gland


my wife has purchased a pill that states it is for the mind (brain)
it is called FOCUS


onehigherpower
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:58 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LastDrinkToday View Post
I've recently read a lot about a supplement called Dihydromyricetin "DHM". It is advertised as a "sober pill" meaning it actually makes you feel more sober if you take it after drinking.

But a lot of research shows it can help a lot with alcohol withdrawal because of the effect it has on GABA receptors (which are heavily effected by long-term alcohol consumption).

This is the article I read about it:
I've started taking DHM a while back for this same purpose! I think it works quite well and would recommend it to anyone. Besides prescription medicine I have yet to find anything better.

The study I read stated "Dihydromyricetin (DHM; 1 mg/kg, i.p. injection), a flavonoid component of herbal medicines, counteracted acute alcohol (EtOH) intoxication, and also withdrawal signs in rats including tolerance, increased anxiety, and seizure susceptibility"

I cant post links but copy that into google and you will find it.

If you are still searching for an easy to obtain natural way to decrease alcohol withdrawal and anxiety with no side effects, I would give DHM a try.
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:10 AM   #12 (permalink)
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When I quit drinking I bought a book called "7 weeks to sobriety".
The book talks extensively about vitamin deficiency causing cravings.
I invested a pretty good chunk of time and money trying to get the vitamins in the book. Niacin, Glutamine,Ester C vitamin C were just a few. Some could not be purchased over the counter,and I skipped those.
The lady that wrote the book was head of ,or ran a rehab place. She claimed way better results than AA. Her son committed suicide from mood swings from alcohol,or hypoglycemia . From then on she set out to help alcoholics.

I had tried many times in the past to quit and failed. After following the book,I succeeded. I have no idea to this day why or how I made it last time. But I often wonder if taking the vitamins in that book didn't play a big part. I have now been sober over 4 and1/2 years.
Fred
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:43 AM   #13 (permalink)
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I had only taken B vitamins to get over those super bad hangovers. Thanks for the idea.
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:07 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Thanks for the information. Just from a biology perspective, vitamin A is stored in fat which perhaps is why high doses for people with fatty livers is not indicated since high levels of A can be toxic. Most of the others are water soluble and will eventually be flushed from the body.
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Old 03-18-2014, 11:41 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Vitamin supplements curb cravings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevertheless View Post
When I quit drinking I bought a book called "7 weeks to sobriety".
The book talks extensively about vitamin deficiency causing cravings.
I invested a pretty good chunk of time and money trying to get the vitamins in the book. Niacin, Glutamine,Ester C vitamin C were just a few. Some could not be purchased over the counter,and I skipped those.

Fred
I have been reading that book as well. I read Susan Powters book "Sober and Staying That Way" and it is focused on supplements and a clean diet. At first I wasn't sure if there was any truth to it but I have found tons of research that shows positive results. I'm working on my supplement shopping list now. I'm only on day 2 (again) so now is a perfect time to start.

DeeDee
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